Spain: Why is one acceptable and not the other?

Easter week in Malaga (Spain) saw the traditional religious-cultural processions and with that the traditional robes and face veils. Please note: these facial coverings and robes are nothing to do with the KKK.

However, what struck me – living in Spain and seeing the different garments – was this:

Why is this acceptable:

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Elizabeth Arif-Fear (c)

And not this?

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Image credit: Rana Ossama (Flickr), Fixers (Flickr), Lain (Flickr)

Why is this acceptable, when I, like many Muslims in Spain, faced prejudice, intolerance and shock whilst living in Spain?

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Elizabeth Arif-Fear (c)

The answer is that to the State:

Islam is not acceptable 

Nuns covering their heads and bodies shows piety yet Muslim women in similar garments represent oppression

Please let’s squish the misconceptions, ignore the lies and get to the facts.

Veiling is a free practice in Islam (as is belief itself) and anyone who forces others to cover is acting against Islam. Veiling is for religious perseverance and modesty. Freedom of religion is a universal right, and we should all have the right to live in a free, tolerant and accepting society. This works for Christian, secular, Muslim, all current States around the world – even through the reality is shockingly different. In fact, the reality is that Christianity and Islam are actually from the same Abrahamic family.

The battle for freedom of religion, peace, tolerance of others and merging of new intercultural and inter-religious identities is ongoing. Spain: hypocrisy and double standards are not a step forward…

Salam!

 

Image credit/copyright:

Feature image: Elizabeth Arif-Fear, Rana Ossama (Flickr)

 

Buckets of Basura – Málaga’s Rubbish Problem

IMG_1391.JPGI live in Málaga in Andalucía, southern Spain, and this is the reality we’ve been facing in our streets.

Rubbish collectors went on strike on the 1st March in Málaga to protest wage cuts. Málaga’s public communal bins are normally emptied every night, so when the strike started, so the rubbish also started to pile up with extra bags and piles of waste in an city which is already loaded with rubbish at times despite daily collections. The strike and lack of attention by the authorities lead to foul smelling rotting rubbish piling up on the streets of Málaga. Even though the strike has been resolved, the clean up has yet to be completed.

Whilst strikes are sometimes necessary – in this case the strikes were due to wage cuts in an area of Spain which suffers from high unemployment and low wages (albeit a low cost of living) – one must ask: where is common sense? The authorities have created a public hazard.

They allowed the situation to get to an extreme for various days before apparently hiring a private rubbish disposal company. This didn’t make much difference as far as I was aware and witness as the rubbish situation had already got to such an extreme and started to smell – and was not later promptly removed.

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The region of Andalucía boats of being the home of the sunny coast: The “Costa del Sol” with towns and cities such as Fuengirola, Benalmádena, Torremolinos, Rincón de la Victoria, Marbella and Málaga which is both an ever popular growing tourist destination and the administrative centre for the region as the provincial capital. How can any authorities let such things get so far? It’s a shame for the people living here. Pay your workers fairly and do your job as far as the local population is concerned. However, make no mistake – as more tourists come to Málaga as the weather picks up – the rubbish was both smack bang in the centre of the city as well as in the local areas. However, the clean up started in the centre.

As I went into the city centre last night, the rubbish had gone but as I sit here on Monday 14th March – the rubbish outside my door has not been collected. All but one of these photos on this blog post were taken YESTERDAY. The strike is over – but the rubbish remains. So it must be asked:

  • Where is public money going?
  • Where is the consideration for public sanitation and safety?
  • Where is the Junta de Andalucía (the regional government) and the local town hall authorities?

Spain loves bureaucracy and love its tourists – but what about everyone as a whole? What about the locals? What about the people that live and work here? Neither locals nor tourists should have to put up with such mess…It’s symptomatic of wider regional and national problems – disorganisation, apathy within the government, economic inequality, corruption, poverty and austerity…

Salam!

malga basyra blog 2 new

For more information on the strike, see here

Image copyright: Elizabeth Arif-Fear

Why do we never hear so much about International Men’s Day…? Here’s why!

woman-704221.jpgIt’s International Women’s Day on March 8th. “Why do we never really hear about International Men’s Day?!” you and many others may ask. “If women and men are equal and human rights are universal then why do we have two separate days?!” others may profess…Well, you see the reality is this: human rights aren’t just a woman’s issue – they aren’t about men vs. women and are instead about universal rights as a global human issue. However, the truth of the matter is that such days raise awareness about different issues affecting the different sexes and as a whole women remain more vulnerable, more abused and at greater risk of exploitation than menInternational Men’s Day focuses on men’s health whilst International Women’s Day focuses on women’s achievements and calls us to keep on fighting the ongoing battle for equality.

That is the reality – women are not treated equally. The introduction of the United Nations Convention for the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) wasn’t to “prioritise women” – it wasn’t against the universal nature of human rights – it was to address needs specific to women and to fight against further abuses directly affecting women and girls. No one would deny that men are at risk (and in some cases at an increasing risk) of forced labour, sexual exploitation, poverty, abuse etc. but as it stands – women’s rights are a big issue that we still need to keep high on the agenda – and here’s a few reasons why…

Gender based human rights abuses

  • Reproductive rights/maternal healthcare – women need adequate access to contraception, pre- and post-natal care and facilities. According to the UN Population Fund: “[…] 830 women still die every day from causes related to pregnancy or childbirth. This is about one woman every two minutes”. Along with the right to life and health, States have to additionally ensure women’s/girl’s access to education and privacy (see here for more information).
  • Literacy rates – a lack of education and poverty go hand in hand and women remain severely disadvantaged due to economic, social and cultural barriers:

774 million adults (15 years and older) still cannot read or write – two-thirds of them (493 million) are women. Among youth, 123 million are illiterate of which 76 million are female. Even though the size of the global illiterate population is shrinking, the female proportion has remained virtually steady at 63% to 64%. (UNESCO)

  • Worker rights – women worldwide face battles with maternity pay, lower wages and access to employment (beyond simply being underrepresented in politics and business) due to discrimination and in some cases may face sexual harassment. The reality is this: “women make up 40% of the global workforce, yet make less than their male counterparts in every country on Earth” (ILRF).

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  • Poverty – many of the inequalities and lack of care women face regarding reproductive health, education and work rights perpetuate further injustice. This isn’t simply having inadequate access to  bras and sanitary protection:

While both men and women suffer in poverty, gender discrimination means that women have far fewer resources to cope. They are likely to be the last to eat, the ones least likely to access healthcare, and routinely trapped in time-consuming, unpaid domestic tasks. They have more limited options to work or build businesses. Adequate education may lie out of reach. Some end up forced into sexual exploitation as part of a basic struggle to survive. (UN Women)

  • Sex trafficking – women are most affected by human slavery. This may involve forced labour but is most often forced prostitution. This is increasingly affecting men but women are still the main victims of sex trafficking (see here for more information). Women trapped in poverty may be offered “a way out” through the promise of a job in another country and find themselves trapped and “in debt” –  abroad, raped, beaten,  alone and scared.
  • Forced marriage – women and young girls  (children!)  are forced/sold into marriage.  1 out of every 9 girls under the age of 15 in the developing world is married.
  • Domestic violence – whilst men are also victims of domestic violence and other forms of domestic abuse (emotional, spiritual and financial abuse for example), it’s important to educate others about this. Women are still more likely to be victims of domestic violence.

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  • Rape – rape occurs within marriage (forced or non forced marriage), it can also be date-rape, forced prostitution or violent crime by strangers but it is also a weapon of war used to humiliate, control and physically, psychologically and emotionally abuse women and girls:

In Liberia, which is slowly recovering after a 13-year civil war, a government survey in 10 counties in 2005-2006 showed that 92% of the 1,600 women interviewed had experienced sexual violence, including rape. (UN Office of The High Commissioner (OHCHR))

  • Acid attacks – Acid attacks are a means to control and humiliate women. Perhaps she rejected your proposal, perhaps you don’t think she’s modest enough, perhaps you were jealous… Whatever the reason, wherever the place – they constitute a severe physical and physiological trauma and the worst part is that they aren’t rare . In the UK the number of hospital admissions for cases of acid attacks has almost doubled in the last 10 years.
  • Honour killings – Women aren’t only being abused by their partners sexually, physically, emotionally, spiritually and financially but are also being killed by their own families. Every year, 5,000 honour killings are reported worldwide (UN). Brothers, fathers, uncles, even mothers commit murder to maintain the “honour” of the family and thus the female relative’s blood is on their hands and her life is lost (see here for more information).
  • Female genital mutilation – across the women and young girls are having parts of their genitals cut and removed in order to control their sexuality, preserve their honour and thus increase their eligibility for marriage. This practice causes immense psychological and physical trauma and can even result in death. See my article on female genital mutilation for more information.

So, there it is – a brief summary of some of the discrimination and abuse that women face worldwide. In reality, whilst every human is endowed with civil, political, cultural, economic and social rights; women face a greater variety of barriers due to discrimination and differing needs – for example regarding reproductive rights and health care. Many factors go hand in hand. If a girl is married too young due to cultural customs and does not receive adequate health care, if a family is poor and struggling, she will no longer go to school and will stay at home caring for the family. As such she may not only be limited regarding work opportunities but in fact living in a cycle of poverty where she remains vulnerable to sexual exploitation and further physical and psychological harm.

While human rights are universal, putting this into practice in relation to women’s needs and the discrimination they face, requires fighting for women’s equality as a specific issue. Feminism and women’s rights movements are not about advancing women to a status above men but simply to the same position as men – which in itself is a still a position in a world of injustice. International Women’s Day is a day for the world to recognise women’s achievements and to remind us to fight for women’s equality against injustice.  We’re not one single sex but we are one humanity. It’s fundamental that men become more involved in the fight for women’s rights. Men, women, girls and boys must fight against injustice for each and every one of them. Equality is the end goal. Men and women are different. Reproductive rights is just one evidence of this but we are equal; equal in dignity and equal in humanity.

Salam!

Image credits:

Megara Tegal (Flickr) (CC) (feature image), Alexandra Loves (Pixabay) (CC), Carlos Lorenzo (Flickr) (CC), Gregory Kowalski (Flickr) (CC)

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