10 Top Human Rights Anthems for Social Activists

I was at the Three Faiths Forum Interfaith Summit the other week and to end the evening we were introduced to range of music from different groups and faith traditions. The last ensemble – The Big Choir – belted out a lovely classic. I knew the song as soon as they announced the name but it wasn’t till I heard it sung that I realised I’d totally failed to take into account the lyrics. It had been years since I’d heard the song and now they were so much more inspiring. This then got me thinking…

There are some great songs out there for the socially minded! Music really has the power to inspire people to create change, to maintain hope in hard times, to build bridges and to remind us of what’s really important and the real struggles that many people sadly face. So, after a great refreshing reminder with this song, I put together my 10 Top Human Rights Anthems list. So, what was the song you may ask? Well you’ll find out when you reach number one on the list!

So here’s my countdown of my chosen top ten human rights anthems. Let me know what you think!

10. The Lighthouse Family – (I Wish I Knew It Would Feel To Be) Free / One
9. Sam Cooke – A Change Is Gonna Come
8. The Scorpions – Winds of Change
7. U2 and Mary J Blige – One
6. John Farnham – You’re The Voice
5. U2 – Love and Peace or Else
4. Marvin Gaye – What’s Going On
3. Sting – Fragile
2. Simon and Garfunkel – He Was My Brother

Due to copyright – here’s a cover (alas sadly not the same!):

1. Labi Siffre – Something Inside So Strong

If you’re anything like me, you’ll have these on repeat over and over! Since I “re-found” my number one, I’ve been listening to it pretty much every day!

So, what are your top human rights anthems? Drop us a comment and let us know!

Salam! ♡



There’s a place for faith in Britain today – Let’s not become divided

There seems to be a belief by some that having a faith somehow makes you “less able to integrate”, less “British” or locked in some sort of cultural-ideological battle. It’s as if being British can only mean one thing: being (White-)Christian, Atheist or Agnostic.

If we look at the rate of hate crime in the UK, there’s no doubt been an increase in hostility against people from minority backgrounds, in particular members of the Muslim and Jewish communities.

To me this is all rather sad as I equate being British as being free to be who you are and in joyful celebration of such tolerance and acceptance. In terms of faith, you could be Christian, agnostic, atheist, Jewish, Sikh, Hindu, Muslim or a range of many other things. We’re a multicultural, multifaith nation where we’re free to be who we are, in the way we want to.

Image credit - Matthew G (CC BY-NC 2.0).jpg

Image Credit: Matthew G (CC BY-NC 2.0)

I for one, as British-born 20-something with “traditional” Welsh/English/Irish and also Italian roots, who’s gone from being a Christian to a Muslim, certainly haven’t become less “British” since changing my faith. If anything, my faith has given me a sense of comfort, belonging and certainty in who I am as an individual. Islam teaches us to respect other people and treat them well. Like all other faiths, it calls upon us to honour social justice, build bridges with others, respect the law of the land and love others as we love ourselves. I therefore don’t see how being a Muslim would take a way anything from my cultural and national identity.

For me it’s values – or a perceived clash of values – that are the problem, not faith. The ultimate manifestation of such “Clash of Civilisations” is extremism – a poisonous ideology which isolates in all forms, from the neo-Nazi group to the jihadist cell. On the surface members of these groups come from different faith/social backgrounds but hatred and violence don’t have a faith. The reality is that these people are socially excluded and feeling victimised, confused and lost. They’re looking for a sense of belonging and empowerment.

What we must remember is that social integration is a two-way unified process. In a free democratic nation, we all have the right to choose our own faith, to speak a second, third or even fourth language and to hold on to our own precious histories, stories and memories. It’s our collective identity – where our multiple identities merge into one – that makes us British. To share an identity we need common values, a shared language and a shared history. We don’t need to belong to any one particular faith.

Image credit - Roberto Trombetta (CC BY-NC 2.0).jpg

Image credit: Roberto Trombetta (CC BY-NC 2.0)

We all have multiple identities. Identities are fluid, they’re hybrid, they’re plural. They change, merge and adapt over time. I’m Muslim yes but I’m also British, I’m European, I’m also a millennial, a second-generation half immigrant, an activist, a Midlander and a wife of a Berber-Algerian! Quite simply, I’m me! When I feel respected and included as a Muslim by non-Muslims I also feel even more heart-warmingly proud to be British.

If you take a look into a British mosque, synagogue or church, you’ll see a myriad of ethnic and cultural backgrounds. These faiths are already uniting people. Faith can and does play a key role in our sense of belonging and unity in British society – let’s celebrate that, please!

However, let’s also not forget that not everyone has a faith. What ultimately brings us together is our sense of solidarity. Whether we can live as a socially integrated nation ultimately depends upon each and every one of us. Ask yourself these questions: do you see your neighbour as a potential friend? Do you love them as you love yourself? Do you feel proud to live in a diverse nation?

As Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) said: “Do good deeds properly, sincerely and moderately. Always adopt a middle, moderate, regular course, whereby you will reach your target (of paradise).” This is a simple crucial message we can all follow, regardless of our own individual faiths.

Credits and acknowledgements

Feature image: AwayWeGo210 (CC BY 2.0)

This article was first published via Three Faiths Forum (15/11/2017)


20 Rumi quotes to inspire you to live and love

The other week I went to a fantastic interfaith poetry and storytelling night ran by Feeding Folk – a Jewish-Muslim project working to serve the homeless across London. The event itself was held at a gem of a little place called Rumi’s Cave in North London. A wonderful homely place, it reflected the fantastic teachings of Jalal ad-Din Muhammad Rumi, a 13th-century Persian Sunni Muslim poet, Islamic jurist, theologian and Sufi mystic whose words inspire peace, love and spirituality. Rumi – a key figure from the Islamic Golden Age – is one of the most popular poets worldwide and a true inspiration with his works translated into multiple other languages.

With this in mind, I’d like to present 20 amazing quotes from Rumi himself which inspire love, peace and a soothing spirituality. Feel the love, soak up the wisdom and revel in their beauty!

1. “Raise your words, not your voice. It is rain that grows flowers, not thunder.” 

Raise your words, not your voice. It is rain that grows flowers, not thunder.”.jpg

2. “If light is in your heart, you will find your way home.”

3. “The only lasting beauty is the beauty of the heart.” 

4. “When the world pushes you to your knees, you’re in the perfect position to pray.”

5. “Only from the heart can you touch the sky.”

Only from the heart can you touch the sky.jpg

6. “Love is not an emotion, it is your very existence.”

7. “When you let go of who you are, you become who you might be.” 

8. “The beauty you see in me is a reflection of you”

9. “Wear gratitude like a cloak and it will feed every corner of your life.”

10. “Through love, thorns become roses.”

Through love, thorns become roses.jpg

11. “Your heart knows the way, run in that direction.”

12. “Where there is ruin, there is hope for treasure.”

13. “Giving thanks for abundance is greater than the abundance itself.”

14. “All doubt, despair and fear become insignificant once the intention of life becomes love.”

15. “Be a lamp, or a lifeboat, or a ladder. Help someone’s soul heal.”

Be a lamp, or a lifeboat, or a ladder. Help someone’s soul heal.jpg

16. “Love is the bridge between you and everything.”

17. “Know that one day, your pain will become your cure.”

18. “We are born of love: love is our mother.”

19. “Your task is not to seek for love, but merely to seek and find all the barriers within yourself that you have built against it.”

20. “You have within you more love than you could ever understand.”

You have within you more love than you could ever understand.jpg

So in the footsteps of Rumi, find peace with yourself and you’ll be at peace with the world!

Salam! ♡