Six things I’ve learnt working on a rough sleepers project

We’re all hearing about it and many of us are seeing more of more of it on the streets across Britain. Yes, tragically, homelessness is on the rise across the UK. Tents, sleeping bags, duvets, people in crisis… Everyone’s seen the dramatic increase in rough sleepers across the country.

According to Homeless Link, around 4,134 people sleep rough every night in England alone. This figure in fact marks an 134% increase since the change in UK government in 2010. In London, that’s an increase from around 400 to almost 1,000 people. Here in the capital we currently have the highest number of rough sleepers across England. It’s truly shocking.

Yet the crisis doesn’t only affect those sleeping rough. There’s also the “invisible homeless” – men, women and children sleeping on friends’ sofas, living in and out of temporary accommodation and with no home to call their own.

Across London, there are a variety of organisations working to provide shelter, food and clothing to people in crisis. One of these is Feeding Folk (Peace by Piece) – an interfaith food programme based at West London Synagogue which brings together Muslims and Jews to cook a hearty hot meal for rough sleepers across London.

Distributing meals across central London, this is what I’ve witnessed and learnt and what I think everyone should know.

1. It costs less than £1 to feed a homeless person a complete hot meal

For a third of the cost of a take-out coffee, you can provide a hot meal, drink, piece of fresh fruit and a snack. The cost is minimal. Yet what is the social and human cost of homelessness? From 2001 to 2009, 1,731 of recorded deaths were traced to homeless people. As temperatures drop during winter, people are especially vulnerable to contracting pneumonia and hypothermia. The government needs to put more money, time and effort in to solve this crisis.

2. The less you have the more you give

The people I’ve met only take food when they’re hungry. If they’ve eaten they’ll be eager for you to to save the food for someone else. Sharing is caring as they say. The saying really is true: the less you have the more you give.

3. Life on the streets truly is hell

It goes without saying that living on the streets is a nightmare but if you could read some of the messages that people write and see what these people are going through… “Hell” was the worst description I have ever seen written.

4. Never underestimate the companionship an animal can bring

Many of us know the joy a pet can bring. Living on the streets is a lonely experience and a pet can bring much-needed comfort. One night we met a man who had recently lost his dog. For him, his dog was his best friend and his life companion. He was “not just a dog”. Housing providers need to understand that a man and his dog come as a pair – they’ll not be separated. Everybody deserves someone and everybody also deserves a home.

5. Almost very single person is grateful

Whatever (little) time, skills or resources you can offer – give them. Every bit will make a difference. To see people heartwarmed or even shocked and surprised at receiving a small meal shows that there is so much more to do. We need to change these heartbreaking trends.

6. Just because someone is sleeping rough doesn’t mean they don’t work

I’ve met people sleeping rough who work and know of many others. Sleeping rough has many causes and contributing factors. Some people lack the funds and/or legal status to rent accommodation after arriving in the UK, whilst for others sleeping rough has been a long-term reality. Do not presume that because someone is sleeping rough, that they have no will, no ambition or no interest in life. In any case, if they didn’t, they’d need emotional and social support.

Take action

Addiction, domestic abuse, financial hardship – there are many reasons why people end up on the streets but one thing is clear: it’s so easy to slip through the net.

It’s time that we raise our voices and tell politicians that this has to end. Write to your local MP and call on them to address the issue.

It’s super easy. Simply:

  1. Look up their contact details here
  2. Download my letter template text and edit the message (stats for your area can be found here)
  3. Copy the text in the webpage above and send!

If you hear back from your MP, then do drop me a line and feedback to me!

So, until next time,

Salam, shalom, peace ♡

Credits

Image credit: Eflon (CC BY 2.0)

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10 Trends which reveal the reality behind gender inequality

You’ve no doubt heard about gender inequality but you may not be aware of the reality that women across the world face. What does “gender inequality” actually mean in real terms? Perhaps you may feel that in your part of the world it’s not an issue. Well, I beg to differ. Statistically speaking, women are more likely to be affected by a range of discrimination and abuse than their male peers due to their gender and the relationship between poverty and prevailing socio-cultural norms. Now, everything has a context and therefore social, cultural and economic factors must be taken into account but by being female – across the so-called “developed” and non-developing world, there are a range of trends that stick and which are unacceptable in the 21st century.

Here’s 10 trends which highlight and exemplify the shocking reality of gender inequality today.

1. Women are the hardest hit by poverty

Women are overall disproportionately affected by poverty. According to the International Labor Organization (ILO), out of the 1.3 billion people worldwide living in extreme poverty, women account for a disproportionately large amount of this figure. But what about in the “developed world”? What about mainstream society? Well, the UN’s research “The World’s Women” in 2015 concluded that in Europe women and girls were greater affected by poverty than men (53%).

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2. More girls leave school early and become illiterate than their male peers

Without an education, you’re more likely to remain trapped in the cycle of poverty and without a doubt, women and girls are the worst affected. Due to a combination of social, cultural and economic factors such as poverty and child marriage, many girls leave school much earlier than is required leaving them unable to gain a solid education and build their future.

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3. Females are more likely to experience sexual violence

We need to break the myth that sexual violence only affects women and girls. It DOES affect men but to a far lesser degree. Many women (as well as men) will also not report or speak out about sexual violence for fear of retribution of social stigma, but the figures we do have are shocking.

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4. Women are excluded from habitually male-led decision making

We’ve all heard of the glass ceiling and it’s real. The lack of females in politics and high management positions is shocking as this ultimately means that women are excluded from decision making, meaning that half of the population remain under-represented in politics, finance etc. – you name it!

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5. Women earn less than their male colleagues for the same job

Not only are women more likely than men to work in undervalued, low-paid or vulnerable jobs but women are also on average paid less than men (ILO, 2012; UN Women, 2017). According to the World Bank, in most countries across the globe, women on average earn only 60-75% of what men do. This is a staggering phenomena in the “Western world” which many find hard to believe.

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6. Being female means you’re more likely to be sold into slavery

Human trafficking is a serious problem across the globe. Most victims of human trafficking are female and the numbers of girls being trafficked is increasing. Human trafficking of women and girls often involves sexual exploitation and is unimaginably detrimental to the psychological, emotional, physical, sexual, social, cultural and economical wellbeing of those affected.

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7. Women are more likely to die from natural hazards

When natural disaster strikes, women are once again at greater risk of harm. Women living in poverty (as usual!) are more likely to be affected than their male counterparts and remain incredibly vulnerable.

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8. Girls are more likely to be affected by HIV and AIDS than their male peers

51% of adults living with HIV are female (UNAIDS, 2015). What’s more, if we break down the figures by age, we find that young girls and women (aged 15 to 24 years old) are particularly vulnerable to infection (UNAIDS 2015; UN Women 2017). New infections amongst young women are higher than that of their male peers and with 45% of teenage girls in certain cases declaring that their first sexual experience was non-consensual, this may not come as a surprise for many people out there (UNAIDS, 2014).

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9. Women spend more time on unpaid housework and less on leisure than men

We may think this is a stereotype but it’s true. Across the world, in pretty much every country, each day men spend more time on leisure activities while women spend more time doing unpaid housework (OECD, 2017). Women take on the major burden of domestic and care work – even when they have a job of their own.

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10. Being born female means you’re more likely to be married as a child

Child marriage predominantly affects girls. Whilst boys can be affected, the numbers show that this is a far less common occurrence. Child marriage results in high numbers of young girls missing out on an education, financial independence and being subject to sexual, emotional and physical abuse. For girls of such a young age, childbirth can even mean death, as their young bodies cannot bear the physical burden.

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So there we are folks. The figures speak for themselves. Please, please – next time you hear someone harping on about “feminism” this and that as though it’s a man-hating phenomena, remind them of these facts. We must keep raising awareness and challenging socio-cultural norms which discriminate against women and perpetuate the marginalisation, exclusion and abuse of so many women – both closer to home and further afield.

Sources, credits and further information

A full list of sources can be downloaded here (PDF)

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