Human Rights: It’s all for one or none for all

Life is but a lesson of learning… The more issues you explore, the more people you meet, the more you learn about them and about yourself. In light of a recurring lesson of mine, I’d like to share with you a beautiful, simple yet oh so powerful poem. You may know it. Take a look…

First They Came

First they came for the Communists
And I did not speak out
Because I was not a Communist
Then they came for the Socialists
And I did not speak out
Because I was not a Socialist
Then they came for the trade unionists
And I did not speak out
Because I was not a trade unionist
Then they came for the Jews
And I did not speak out
Because I was not a Jew
Then they came for me
And there was no one left
To speak out for me.

Pastor Martin Niemoller

This short but very poignant poem refers back to the era of Nazi Germany and the failure of German intellectuals to stand up to the Nazis. Dating back to the middle of the last century, it is as relevant as ever in an era of rising hate crime, neo-Nazi/far-right groups and religious extremism to name a few, despite the public awareness of human rights, the availability of resources to learn about each others’ rights and the wide range of means/mediums to speak out (social media, lobbying organisations etc.).

This poem in fact highlights a few very serious key points, which can be summed up in the following famous quotes:

  • “Love for others what you love for yourself” (Prophet Muhammad, pbuh)
  • “You’re either part of the solution or part of the problem” (Eldridge Cleaver)
  • “All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing” (Edmund Burke)
  • “I am not free while any women is unfree, even when her shackles are very different from my own” (Audre Lorde)

What is the overall message you may ask? Well, put quite simply it’s this: you cannot be free whilst someone else is oppressed. You cannot advocate for peace whilst hating others and you cannot call for the rights of one group, whilst advocating hatred or intolerance for another. No one is saying we all have to have the same beliefs or opinions, but common decency and universal rights are not exclusive. Where human rights are concerned it’s in the famous words of the three musketeers (!) that things go: “It’s all for one, and one for all!”.

Imagine this: you want others to accept and accommodate your religious beliefs but you won’t do the same. Not very logical is it? Or you want women to have the freedom to wear what you want them to wear but not what they may or may not want to wear. Not a simple pick and choose is it? Bearing that in mind, I’d like to lay out the following scenarios. For simplicity sake, we’ll use the names “Mr A” and “Mrs A”:

  1. “Mr A” advocates for the rights of Muslim minorities in Europe but perpetuates anti-Shia, anti-Sunni, anti-Ahmadi rhetoric.
  2. “Mrs A” is outraged at the discrimination hijabis face but forces her daughter to cover and won’t accept difference of opinion related to covering within Muslim circles.
  3. “Mr and Mrs A” are campaigning for the rights of Palestinians yet victimise the Jewish community, refusing to separate faith from politics and fail to stand up to rising anti-Semitism
  4. “Mr A” is outraged about the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq but doesn’t put pen to paper and seek genuine dialogue
  5. “Mrs A” expresses concern for UK foreign policy in the Middle East yet stays silent about the famine in Yemen caused by the Saudi led war, the abuse of women in Saudi law and Iran, the suffering of the Uyghurs in China, the cause of the Tibetans etc.
  6. “Mr and Mrs A” stands up for the religious/cultural/ethnic rights of their personal communities but stay silent about the abuse and difficulties that others face.

What is the message in all of these cases? Well, the message is quite clearly this: they’ve got it wrong! They’re missing the point. If it’s human rights you want, if it’s justice, freedom and equality, then it’s all for one and one for all! So when you’re advocating for a specific cause, ask yourself the following questions:

  • Am I advocating a message of peace, non-violence, tolerance and unity? (Unbiased educated criticism is allowed but violence is counter-productive!)
  • Am I utilising the correct tools, networks and organisations which advocate peace and tolerance? (Giving/sharing a platform with an intolerant, bigoted group is also a counter-productive no-no!)
  • Is my message inclusive or exclusive? (Am I alienating or spreading hatred of others?)
  • What is my ultimate message and purpose? (Am I aiming for a positive outcome which will resolve conflict and abuse?)

Remember: calling out abuse is always going to ruffle a few feathers. That’s not the problem! The problem is when your method goes against the principles and purpose of what you’re fighting for – or if you’re cause is exclusive in the rights and aims you’re fighting for.

Think about this and remember, when we’re talking about rights: it’s all for one and one for all!

Salam

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The Islamic call for justice and peace (part 2): 30 hadith from the life of the Prophet Mohammed (PBUH)

In my last post, I included 30 citations from the Qur’an looking at peace, compassion, mercy and justice. In part two, I am now going to finish this series by looking at the second textual source of Islam: the hadith. These are the collections of the sayings, behaviour and teachings of the Prophet Mohammed (pbuh) as an exemplary guide of the core messages of the Qur’an. So here is an outline of the teachings of peacemaking, just ruling, honesty, kindness, charity and non-violence.

1. The best jihad is a word of truth in front of a tyrannical ruler.

2. ‘Assist your brother or sister Muslim, whether he be an oppressor or an oppressed.’ ‘But how shall we do it when someone is an oppressor?’ Muhammad said, ‘Assisting an oppressor is by forbidding and withholding that person from oppression.’

3. Truly God instructs me to be humble and lowly and not proud, and no one should oppress others.

4. Faith is a restraint against all violence, let no Mu’min [believer] commit violence.

5. Deal gently with the people, and be not harsh; cheer them and condemn them not.

6. Kindness is a mark of faith, and whoever has not kindness has not faith.

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Image credit: Fahrurrazy Halil

7. Allah will not be merciful to those who are not merciful to people.

8. The proud will not enter paradise, nor a violent speaker.

9. Someone said to the Prophet, ‘Pray to God against the idolators and curse them.’ The Prophet replied, ‘I have been sent to show mercy and have not been sent to curse.’

10. All God’s creatures are His family; and he or she is the most beloved of God who tries to do most good to God’s creatures.

11. The best of people is one from whom good accrues to humanity.

12. What actions are most excellent? To gladden the heart of a human being, to feed the hungry, to help the afflicted, to lighten the sorrow of the sorrowful, and to remove the wrongs of the injured.

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Image credit: BRQ Network

13. Anyone of you who sees wrong, let him undo it with his hand; and if he cannot, then let him speak against it with his tongue, and if he cannot do this either, then (let him abhor it) with his heart, and this is the least of faith.

14. The most beloved in the sight of God, on the day of resurrection, and the nearest to Him, in regard to position, shall be the just leader; and the most hateful of men in the sight of God on the day of resurrection, and the farthest removed form Him, shall be the tyrannical leader.

15. God is gentle and loves gentleness.

16. There is a Sadaqa [charitable gift] to be given for every joint of the human body; and for every day on which the sun rises there is a reward of a Sadaqa  for the one who establishes justice among people.

17. You will not enter Paradise until you believe and you will not believe until you love each other. Shall I show you something that, if you did, you would love each other? Spread peace between yourselves.

18. You should show courtesy and be cordial with each other, so that nobody should consider himself superior to another nor do him harm.

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Image credit: Mary Quite Contrary

19. Do not turn away a poor man…even if all you can give is half a date. If you love the poor and bring them near you… God will bring you near Him on the Day of Resurrection.

20. Avoid cruelty and injustice…and guard yourselves against miserliness, for this has ruined nations who lived before you.

21. Seven kinds of people will be sheltered under the shade of God on the Day of Judgement…They are: a just ruler, a young man who passed his youth in the worship and service of God…,one whose heart is attached to the mosque…,two people who love each other for the sake of God…,a man who is invited to sin…but declines, saying ‘I fear God’…,one who spends his charity in secret, without making a show…and one who remembers God in solitude so that his eyes overflow.

22. Make your character good for the people.

23. It is better for a leader to make a mistake in forgiving than than to make a mistake in punishing.

24. None of you truly believes until he wishes for his brother what he wishes for himself.

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Image credit: Hamed Saber

25. There is a reward for kindness to every living thing.

26. The worst of guardians is a cruel ruler. Beware of becoming one of them.

27. The most hated person in the sight of Allah is the most quarrelsome person.

28. Whoever forsakes his brother for a year, it is as if he has shed his blood.

29. A true believer does not taunt or curse or abuse or talk indecently.

30. To administer justice between two people is charity.

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Image credit: Jonah Bettio

So, that is the concluding part of this brief two part series aimed at giving a core outline of Islam contrary to ISIS ideology, Islamophobic discourse and mass media rhetoric. To be a true Muslim, you must believe in mercy, justice, honesty, truth and and peace and strive to act in accordance with these values in your daily life. Once again – ISIS does not represent Islam!

Salam!

Credits/further information:

Feature image: Steve Browne and John Verkleir

The Threshold Society (2001) ‘A Collection of Hadith on Non-Violence, Peace and Mercy

For a further more extensive list of websites consulted, click here

The Islamic call for justice and peace (part 1): 30 citations from the Qur’an

When Muslims meet, they are obliged to great each other with the words “Assaalam aleykum” (peace be upon you). Such greeting is a reminder not simply of being a believer (Muslim) but of the essence of Islam itself through the blessings and duties that come with being a Muslim. Salam (peace) is the essence of Islam – peace in obeying God, being at peace with your spiritual needs and with family, friends, neighbours through mutual rights and responsibilities. In  obeying Allah’s command’s to give charity, be kindtruthful, forgiving, merciful, to avoid greed and not transgress limits and all that harms one’s soul and community, we can find peace. Alongside peace itself is justice when we are just towards others, Allah is just towards us. We live in a just society and we find peace. This is the essence of Islam.

I’d like to give a brief insight into the call for justice and peace within Islamic scripture. In this article, the focus is the primary textual source of Islam: the Qur’an. Here are 30 citations from the Qur’an which highlight the importance of and call for justice and peace.

  1. Indeed, those who believe and do righteous deeds and establish prayer and give zakah [obligatory charity] will have their reward with their Lord, and there will be no fear concerning them, nor will they grieve. (2:2 77)

2. Fight in the way of Allah those who fight you but do not transgress. Indeed. Allah does not like transgressors. (2:190)

3. And when he goes away, he strives throughout the land to cause corruption therein and destroy crops and animals. And Allah does not like corruption. (2: 205)

4. They ask you, [O Muhammad], what they should spend. Say, “Whatever you spend on good is [to be] for parents and relatives and orphans and the needy and the traveler. And whatever you do of good – indeed, Allah is Knowing of it.” (2: 215)

5. Those who disbelieve in the signs of Allah and kill the prophets without right and kill those who order justice from among the people – give them tidings of a painful punishment. (3:21)

6. Kind speech and forgiveness are better than charity followed by injury. And Allah is Free of need and Forbearing. (2:263)

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Image credit: Ahmad Naufal

7. And let there be [arising] from you a nation inviting to [all that is] good, enjoining what is right and forbidding what is wrong, and those will be the successful. (3: 104)

8. O you who have believed, be persistently standing firm in justice, witnesses for Allah , even if it be against yourselves or parents and relatives. Whether one is rich or poor, Allah is more worthy of both. So follow not [personal] inclination, lest you not be just. And if you distort [your testimony] or refuse [to give it], then indeed Allah is ever, with what you do, Acquainted. (4:135)

9. Allah will say, “This is the Day [of Judgement] when the truthful will benefit from their truthfulness.” For them are gardens [in Paradise] beneath which rivers flow, wherein they will abide forever, Allah being pleased with them, and they with Him. That is the great attainment. (5:119)

10. And the weighing [of deeds] that Day will be the truth. So those whose scales are heavy – it is they who will be the successful. (7:8)

11. Indeed, Allah orders justice and good conduct and giving to relatives and forbids immorality and bad conduct and oppression. He admonishes you that perhaps you will be reminded. (16:90)

12. O you who have believed, fear Allah and speak words of appropriate justice. (33:70)

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Image credit: Phalinn Ooi

13. And O my people, give full measure and weight in justice and do not deprive the people of their due and do not commit abuse on the earth, spreading corruption. (11:85)

14. O you who have believed, be persistently standing firm for Allah, witnesses in justice, and do not let the hatred of a people prevent you from being just. Be just; that is nearer to righteousness. And fear Allah; indeed, Allah is Acquainted with what you do. (5:80)

15. They who believe and do not mix their belief with injustice– those will have security, and they are [rightly] guided. (6:82)

16. By which Allah guides those who pursue His pleasure to the ways of peace and brings them out from darknesses into the light, by His permission, and guides them to a straight path. (5:16)

17. And do not make [your oath by] Allah an excuse against being righteous and fearing Allah and making peace among people. And Allah is Hearing and Knowing. (2: 224)

18. And Allah invites to the Home of Peace [Heaven]and guides whom He wills to a straight path (10:25)

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Image credit: Bryan se

19. And the servants of the Most Merciful are those who walk upon the earth easily, and when the ignorant address them [harshly], they say [words of] peace […] (25:63)

20. And if they incline to peace, then incline to it [also] and rely upon Allah. Indeed, it is He who is the Hearing, the Knowing. (8:61)

21. These are the verses of Allah . We recite them to you, [O Muhammad], in truth; and Allah wants no injustice to the worlds. (3:108)

22. But when He saves them, at once they commit injustice upon the earth without right. O mankind, your injustice is only against yourselves, [being merely] the enjoyment of worldly life. Then to Us is your return, and We will inform you of what you used to do. (10:23)

23. And establish weight in justice and do not make deficient the balance. (55:9)

24. And among those We created is a community which guides by truth and thereby establishes justice. (7:181)

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Image credit: Nunzia Bushra

25. O mankind, indeed We have created you from male and female and made you peoples and tribes that you may know one another. Indeed, the most noble of you in the sight of Allah is the most righteous of you. Indeed, Allah is  Knowing and Acquainted. (49:13)

26. It is that of which Allah gives good tidings to His servants who believe and do righteous deeds. Say, [O Muhammad], “I do not ask you for this message any payment [but] only good will through kinship.” And whoever commits a good deed – We will increase for him good therein. Indeed, Allah is Forgiving and Appreciative. (42:23)

27. Indeed, We have made that which is on the earth adornment for it that We may test them [as to] which of them is best in deed. (18:7)

28. Righteousness is not that you turn your faces toward the east or the west, but [true] righteousness is [in] one who believes in Allah , the Last Day, the angels, the Book, and the prophets and gives wealth, in spite of love for it, to relatives, orphans, the needy, the traveler, those who ask [for help], and for freeing slaves; [and who] establishes prayer and gives zakah; [those who] fulfill their promise when they promise; and [those who] are patient in poverty and hardship and during battle. Those are the ones who have been true, and it is those who are the righteous. (2:177)

29. And give the relative his right, and [also] the poor and the traveler, and do not spend wastefully. (17:26)

30. Who spend [in the cause of Allah ] during ease and hardship and who restrain anger and who pardon the people – and Allah loves the doers of good; […] (3:134)

So, once again – a short and sweet very brief insight into Islam but I hope to have highlighted the command to be just, to look after one another and to leave in peace.

Salam!

Credits/further information:

Feature image: doBot

Quranic citations: Sahih International translation of the Qur’an (see here)