20 Shameful laws you’d never believe were real

Imagine living in a society where your basic freedoms are violated. Where you risk imprisonment for not following certain religious practices or from suffering devastating health complications? Well, it may seem unimaginable but this is the stark reality of human rights worldwide.

In fact, day in day our fundamental rights are being violated by governments worldwide. I’ve drawn up a list of 20 shocking legal scenarios in countries all across the world – across almost every continent – to show just how precious our human rights and why we must never give up the fight for freedom and justice worldwide. So with that, I present to you, in no particular order: 20 laws that you’d never believe were real – but very much are!

1. Being the “wrong kind of Muslim” can lead to the death penalty 

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In Pakistan, strict blasphemy laws include the death penalty for those found guilty

In Pakistan, Ahmadi Muslims are forbidden from calling themselves ‘Muslims’. If an Ahmadi Muslim gives the call to prayer (makes the azan), recites from the Holy Qur’an in public or greets people with the typical greeting: Assalam aleykum (‘Peace be upon you’) and is found guilty, then they not only face three years in prison but also the death penalty according to current blasphemy laws (although no such executions have yet taken place). Read one case here.

2. Having a miscarriage can lead to imprisonment

In El Salvador, if you suffer a miscarriage you could face 30 years in prison for “aggravated homicide”. Read about one ongoing case here of a young girl in El Salvador having suffered a still birth who has been accused of killing her child and is currently in prison.

3. Marrying the girl you rape means you can escape criminal charges 

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In 2012, 16-year-old Amina Filali (Morocco) committed suicide after being forced to marry her rapist. The law was later amended following protests and pressure from Amnesty International

Rather shamefully, in many countries across the globe, if you are found to have raped a girl/woman but marry her, you can legally avoid a criminal conviction. This is the sad reality in a variety of countries including Bahrain, IraqKuwaitLibya and Palestine. Thankfully, a host of other nations worldwide across the MENA region, Latin America and Europe – including Morocco, Egypt, Tunisia and Jordan – have  appealed / are soon to amend such laws with Bahrain next in the queue. See here and here for more information.

4. FGM is legal and carried out in hospitals

Despite attempts to ban FGM in Indonesia, the practice is still legal. According to UNICEF, a staggering 49% of girls in Indonesia aged 14 and under have been victim to FGM/C (2010 – 2015) which is in fact carried out in local hospitals. Read more here.

5. It is illegal to go to school in a headscarf 

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Public displays of “conspicuous religious symbols” mean that Muslim women/girls cannot wear a headscarf at school, whilst small crucifixes as pendants are allowed

In France, if you’re Muslim hijabi (you wear a headscarf) then you are unable to teach in State primary and secondary schools. Likewise, students cannot wear a headscarf to school. In 2004, a new law on “conspicuous religious symbols in schools” was introduced, meaning that Muslim women and girls were ever pushed to work/study in private Islamic schools or give up their right to wear their hijab. The law also applies for Jewish kippahs and Sikh turbans.

6. Your faith is officially banned 

Religious persecution is rife across the globe and China holds no exception. Having officially banned the practice of the Falun Gong, they’ve gone even further as to harvest their organs illegally. Read more here.

7. It’s legal to marry girls aged 14 years or under

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A 14-year-old girl in preparation for marriage (Indonesia) – Image credit: UN Photo/Armin Hari (CC BY NC-ND 2.0)

It’s estimated that 1 in 5 girls worldwide are married before their 18th birthday. In Bangladesh, Iran, Saudi Arabia and certain US States, children as young as 14 or less are also being drastically let down by the law. In Indonesia [pictured], the official legal minimum age for marriage is 16 for girls and 19 for boys, but exceptions can be made. Over in the USA, a series of legal “loopholes” mean children as young as five can technically be married to middle-aged men. In Iran, the standard legal age of marriage is a shocking 13 years old but girls as young as nine or 10 years old can be married by their fathers/grandfathers by getting permission from the courts.

8. You cannot go out in public as a female if you’re not covering your hair and body 

Imagine being forced to cover – not out of religious choice – but legal obligation? This is the reality in Saudi Arabia and Iran. In Saudi, women are legally obliged to wear an abaya (long gown) and headscarf, whilst women in Iran are also obliged to dress according to the requirements of hijab by wearing long, lose, opaque clothing covering the body and a headscarf covering their head and hair.

9. You can legally have sexual intercourse if you’re 14 years old in over 30% of European States

Did you know that across Europe, children – yes children – aged as young as 14 can legally have sex? This is quite simply unbelievable. Where is this you may ask? Well check out this long list: Albania, Andorra, Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Estonia, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Lichtenstein, Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Portugal, San Marino, Serbia and Vatican City. That’s a shocking 16 out of 52 States

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In just under a third of EU States, children aged 14 years old can “legally have sex”, meaning adults can escape prosecution for having sexual relations with young girls/boys

10. Husbands can forbid their wives from working 

In Cameroon and Guinea, if you don’t want your wife to work, then you have every legal right to forbid her from doing so. In Afghanistan and Yemen, a husband also has the legal right to stop/control how and when his wife can leave the house, therefore affecting her ability to work.

11. You cannot legally get divorced 

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As in the Catholic faith, the legal system in The Philippines means that a couple cannot get divorced – as is in the case in the Vatican City

The Philippines – and more obviously Vatican City – a married couple cannot seek a legal divorce. A couple can get their marriage annulled which requires a mental health assessment, court appearance and generally lengthy and expensive process. However, things might be set to change. Read more here and watch this space!

12. It’s legal to hit your wife 

Imagine if you were not only subject to domestic violence but had no legal right to seek justice? Well this is the reality in a host of countries including: Armenia, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Congo, Egypt, Haiti, Ivory Coast, Iran, Latvia, Lesotho, Niger, Nigeria and Yemen. Find out more here.

13. Telling people that gay people are normal is a criminal offence

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As astonishing as it sounds, the Russian federal law “for the Purpose of Protecting Children from Information Advocating for a Denial of Traditional Family Values” – known as the “Gay propaganda law” – makes it illegal to “promote non-heterosexual relationships” to minors. The law effectively stigmatises and entire community and promotes homophobia. Read more here and here.

14. Husbands face no legal charges for raping their wife

Despite the attitude of some people which denies marital rape as a “concept”, marital rape is in fact “permitted” legally in the following countries: Ghana, India, Indonesia, Jordan, Lesotho, Nigeria, Oman, Singapore, Sri Lanka, and Tanzania. In her study, Emily Shugerman found four of these countries also allow marital rape when the victim is still a child.

15. Women cannot legally enter football stadiums 

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Image credit: Chris Marchant (CC BY 2.0)

Iran comes up trumps again for another law aimed at women. Yes, if you’re a woman in Iran you cannot enter a football stadium – well not legally anyway. The reasoning behind this law? Absolutely no idea!

16. You can be executed for homosexual acts 

We all know that LGBT rights are sadly lacking in many countries but in 11 countries in particular, you can be executed for “committing homosexual acts”. Yep, in Afghanistan, Brunei, Iran, Iraq, Mauritania, northern Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, southern Somalia, Sudan and Yemen, you face the death penalty. Find out information here.

17. You can legally buy a gun but are deemed too young to buy alcohol 

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I find it very very odd indeed that in the USA, you can buy a gun (with some exceptions) aged 18 but you’re still deemed too young (and immature) to buy alcohol. Whatever your stance on gun ownership (I’m firmly against), I can’t see any sort of logic that says you’re only mature enough to buy alcohol aged 21 (a substance which can affect your own health and potentially other people through your behaviour) but you can own a highly dangerous violent weapon which can automatically kill others…?

18. Eating and drinking in public during Ramadan is illegal 

During the month of Ramadan, Muslims fast during daylight hours. This is of course – or should be – a spiritual choice for God and God alone. However, in many Muslim countries it’s actually illegal to eat and drink in public during daylight hours in Ramadan. This includes: Iran, Morocco, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the UAE. Now, I’m not advocating being disrespectful and wafting food right under people’s noses (a bit of sensitivity can go a long way) but for non-Muslims and non-practising Muslims alike (also those unable to fast!), this is a step too far.

19. You cannot join a worker’s trade union 

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Image credit: habeebee (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Trade unions are an important mechanism for workers, enabling them to come together for the protection of their working rights such as the right to appropriate, safe working conditions, equal adequate pay and the right to vacation and adequate rest and leisure. But if you’re in the UAE, trade unions are officially illegal. Full stop. Currently also illegal in Saudi Arabia, the government is now in the process of introducing the General Union of Saudi Workers.

20. You must earn £18,600 a year (plus £2,400 – £3,800 per child) for your spouse to be able to live with you in your country 

Picture this: you go abroad to study and you meet the love of your life. Or perhaps, you fall in love with a fellow student and decide you want to get married and stay in your country. What’s the problem? Well, hang on. If your partner is a non-EU citizen and you want them to live with you at home, unless they’re going to be your carer or they’re from a war zone, then you’re obliged to earn £18,600 a year to be able to sponsor them and apply for a spousal visa to live together in the UK. Add on top £3,800 for your first child and £2,400 for each other individual child. Where is this strange law? Well, it’s right here in the UK!

So there you have it folks – a small snapshot into just why we need human rights conventions, mechanisms, laws and courts!

Salam!

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Where’s the love brothers and sisters? A first-hand account of the worldwide persecution faced by the Ahmadiyya Muslim community

There is a community of Muslims in the UK who many Muslims refuse to accept as Muslim. A community of people whom in many countries worldwide are actively persecuted – denied the right to go to perform Hajj in Mekkah, denied the right to call themselves Muslim, denied the right to own official mosques and quite simply denied the right to freely live the way they wish to in line with their beliefs. On many occasions they have been victims of violence and even been killed

Yes, this brothers and sisters in faith and humanity is the Ahmadiyya Muslim community. For many, simple referring to my fellow brothers and sisters is somewhat of a “blasphemy”. Now I’m not going to get into religious “debates” here. Instead, I’d like to present a guest blog by an associate of mine – Dr Irfan Malik who is himself a member of the Ahmadiyya community and based in the UK. Here’s his honest and quite often shocking story of the discrimination that he and his fellow community members face each and every day here in the UK and across the globe.

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Persecution Faced by the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community

The Ahmadiyya Muslim community was founded by Hazrat Mirza Ghulam Ahmed in 1889 in Qadian, India. He proclaimed to be the ‘Promised Messiah’.

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Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmed (Image credit: sirsheraz, CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Our community is now established in over 200 countries, with tens of millions of followers. The UK chapter was established in 1913 and built London’s first Mosque, known as ‘The London Mosque’ inaugurated in 1926 in Southfields. We are guided by our spiritual leader and Khalifa, His Holiness Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmed, the 5th successor to the Promised Messiah [pictured].

The community is actively involved in humanitarian and charity projects all over the world. Each branch regularly holds interfaith events and peace conferences. We portray the true peaceful message of Islam, as taught by the Holy Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him). Our motto is: Love for all, hatred for none.

Unfortunately however, our peaceful community has been the target of persecution in other Muslim countries including Pakistan, Bangladesh, Indonesia and across the MENA region – simply due to our beliefs.

I will now give a summary of how Pakistan has treated Ahmadiyya Muslims over the years.

Legalised discrimination in Pakistan

pakistan-895319_1920.jpgThe Ahmadiyya Muslim community has suffered decades of religious discrimination and persecution in Pakistan. Since the creation of Pakistan in 1947, it is estimated that 302 Ahmadis have been killed for their beliefs.

In 1974, under pressure from religious clerics, Prime Minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto passed legislation declaring the Ahmadiyya community as non-Muslims. In 1984, General Zia ul Haq decided to impose even stricter restrictions on the Ahmadiyya community by introducing the Ordinance XX, thereby forbidding Ahmadis from calling themselves ‘Muslims’ or even posing as one.

Public preaching or professing of beliefs was banned and Ahmadiyya Mosques had to be renamed ‘places of worship’. It became illegal for Ahmadis to give the call to prayer (Azan), publicly recite the Holy Qur’an, or greet people with ‘Assalam alaikum‘ (‘May peace be upon you’) [as is commanded for every Muslim].

A person found guilty of these crimes would face three years imprisonment or even a death sentence if sentenced under the current blasphemy laws. These laws and ordinances have severely undermined Ahmadis’ rights to freedom of religion or belief and have further increased their experiences of discrimination and hostility in Pakistan.

Below are some examples of recent acts of violence:

In my ancestral village of Dulmial in Punjab, the Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosque ‘Darul Zikr‘ was attacked on 12th December 2016 by a huge mob of over 4,000 people. They used semi-automatic weapons to gain entry and set fire to the mosque. The local police were overwhelmed and unable to stop the assault and eventually the Pakistani army were called in to gain control. One Ahmadi Muslim, my uncle, died during this violent attack. The mosque remains sealed to this day and is guarded by armed police.

A recent report entitled ‘Ahmadis in Pakistan Face an Existential Threat‘ published by the International Human Rights Committee, explores the  ongoing persecution faced by Ahmadi Muslims across Pakistan in detail and is worth a read.

Life in the UK: Intrafaith relations
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Bait Ul Futuh mosque (Morden, London) – Home to the local Ahmaddiya community

In the UK, Ahmadiyya Muslims have also suffered discrimination and persecution with the most horrific example being the murder of shopkeeper Asad Shah in Glasgow in March 2016. Unfortunately, the hatred continues to be propagated by certain preachers.

Personally, I have experienced situations where an Interfaith Council asked us to change our name to ‘Ahmadiyya Association‘ instead of ‘Ahmadiyya Muslim Association‘. Some Muslim leaders have also advised us to leave certain police and council consultation meetings as they didn’t accept us as ‘Muslims’, whilst a leading academic criminologist backed out of researching hate crimes against Ahmadi Muslims due to concerns about their safety.

Most recently, as we launched an event as part of ‘Visit My Mosque’ day in February this year, there was a campaign and sermons telling people not to attend. The recent billboard campaign advertising the beliefs of Ahmadiyya Muslims has also received complaints and several displays were removed.

Hate against Ahmadiyya Muslims is in fact common place on social media and YouTube. Whilst ‘Islamophobia’ is regularly highlighted and researched, the hate against Ahmadiyya Muslims and sectarian issues within the Muslim community are infrequently mentioned or studied. I am extremely thankful to Tell MAMA and Faith Matters as these projects/organisations have had the courage to raise and challenge this type of hate.

Organisations monitoring and recording hate crimes need to highlight these terrible acts for all, regardless of faith, colour and creed and not be selective. As Kofi Annan, former Secretary General of the United Nations declared: “We may have different religions, different languages, different coloured skin, but we all belong to one human race”.

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imDr Irfan Malik, is a GP based in Nottingham (UK). An active member of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, he is also a keen First World War researcher. 

Credits and acknowledgements

I’d like to thank Dr Malik for this thought-provoking peace and offer my sincere condolences for the loss of his uncle.

I urge each and every one of you who have read this piece to share and spread the message that this type of abuse is simply not acceptable. For everyone out there – and especially non-Ahmadi Muslims – I urge you to report intrafaith-based hate crime, to welcome your Ahmadi brothers and sisters and to challenge the hate-fuelled discriminatory rhetoric out there. We need greater inclusion, great unity and less hypocrisy of “peace and unity”. Actions speak louder than words. Rights are for all – regardless of your particular thoughts, opinions and beliefs.

For more information and to take action, please visit the following Amnesty UK blog.

Salam ♡

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Misogyny in North Africa: My experiences as a British Muslimah

In a previous post I talked about sexism in the British workplace and in keeping with the theme of sexism, I’d like to talk about my experiences as a British Muslimah in relation to North African culture. I’m married to a North African man and I’ve travelled to, worked and lived in a variety of North African countries both pre- and post-conversion and before and after getting married. In this post, I’d like to look at the issues I’ve really noticed since converting to Islam and travelling to the region including first, second and third hand experiences of blatant discrimination, sexism, hypocrisy and misogyny that women in the area face. Now, I’m not saying these things happen across the board and I’ve certainly not included examples from very traditional circles but I’d like to talk about some experiences which I’ve found difficult, confusing, frustrating, upsetting and in some cases have made me feel utterly trapped and powerless – all of which are against (moderate) Islamic teachings. For more on the issue of sexism and Islam, see my previous post on gender jihad which has already touched on what is and isn’t Islamic when it comes to women and the unfortunate way some are treated.

Primarily, the overriding problem and any example of misogyny I can think of (mostly) seems to be related to the following overarching concept:

“A woman’s place is in the home”

First of all, not all women in the region are at home every second of the day. However this concept really underpins the problems I’ve encountered. It affects every aspect of women’s lives. There are many many women with jobs – most of the doctors I’ve met are in fact women and many women do hold roles outside the home. What’s more, women and girls can also enjoy being at home relaxing in their free time but the reality is that I’ve faced gossiping, backbiting and criticism for “leaving the house too much” (women sadly do this too folks!). Whilst on holiday, being busy organising and getting married and taking my father out so we could enjoy a holiday, I’ve been subjected to wagging tongues trying to control  my life. The manipulation of Islam to the extent that women are told they need to stay at home in safe places to extreme lengths (for obscene periods of time) is wrong and unhealthy yet it is used to perpetuate a deeply ingrained misogyny.

Inside the home: No need for a man’s input

On a practical level, this means that the home is the woman’s domain and most men don’t lift even a finger at home. The kitchen is out of bounds to male guests who may want to cook as the kitchen is for females – of all ages – and females only. No men allowed! Men generally will not learn to cook but will boil an egg, fry chips or make an omelette if hungry and their wife/sister/mum is not around. In restaurants however, all the waiters and chefs are male. It is generally seen as shameful for women to serve men in public but to serve men in the home is viewed as normal. If a man does cook, this will be kept quiet to save face.

If a husband works full time and his wife is at home with the kids, you’d expect that she would take care of domestic matters but that shouldn’t exclude men from helping out and taking responsibility. For women who work full-time – let’s not forget that we all need a decent standard of living and many many many girls go to university and want a job – she can generally not expect the housework to be divided. I’ve been told that women are apparently “happy” to have a full-time job and do all of the housework (and essentially have two jobs). Of course, if you live with in-laws/parents, there is help but domestic duties – cooking, cleaning etc. – are carried out by women/females only. ONE thing however: men will often do the shopping. Some markets are also off limits to women due to apparently “dodgy behaviour” in such areas fully saturated with men, which are deemed inappropriate for women. To be fair, by the sounds of it I’d not want to go but there’s something ironic there about only men being able to buy food that they’re never going to cook themselves…

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In the home, cooking is seen as a woman’s job – even if she works full time (Photo: Elizabeth Arif-Fear – CC)


Outside the home: Ignoring women’s needs 

What does all of this mean outside of the home? As I’ve already explained, it means being judged based on your movements and being subject to gossip for being “outside the house too much”, even if you’re simply shopping, meeting friends, eating out etc. This concept of a women’s place being the home really does have much wider ramifications. It essentially dictates to society that the public sphere is male – in other words: “leave it to the males” as “things are best run by men”. This translates to needing men’s permission to do anything and women’s issues requiring male validation. Here comes the unfortunate dichotomy of public (male) and private (female) spheres. We’ve heard it all before but it’s true!

On a social level, I found this meant I was often excluded within my own personal circles – even when I was with men. Imagine you’re in a busy tourist agency and as the only female you’re ignored in a three person conversation. Out of respect due to culture/religion? Well…the man in question booking your trip is told you speak French in an attempt to include you in the conversation. You have to butt in and take charge in order to be included in your own activities, obviously feeling very very frustrated. Or, in another scenario: a male stops talking to his wife without a word of warning to hold a conversation with an incoming male. She’s the second class invisible third party…

This also means that facilities prioritise men and that there is a severe lack of public facilities for women. For example, the local coffee shop is the men’s “palace”. Yes, everyone needs a place to chill out with their friends or to get some time on your own but why are there no coffee places for girls? The Gulf for example has plenty of women-only facilities. The response is “girls belong at home” and “girls want to stay at home”. One question comes to mind though: all the time…? In terms of dividing public money, I’ve seen male sports facilities but nothing for girls. If money is an issue, why not scale down the buildings? It would appear that women don’t need and/or deserve a gym and that men come first. This is no trivial matter folks. If the public sphere is dominated with men, then half the population are both under- and misrepresented. If there’s a problem, the women tend to suffer and I have indeed found that it seems to put the women at a disadvantage. Imagine this: “illegal sexual activity” is going on in public toilets. What action is taken? The women’s toilets are closed. So, we have functioning male toilets but nothing for the ladies. Whilst the men have toilet facilities, ladies are left with nothing. Not exactly ideal during that time of the month…

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Local cafés: a men’s world… (Photo: Xuoan Duquesne – CC)

This leads to another point. The lack of female representation also means that the women are not only under-represented in terms of opinions and facilities but that women’s specific needs are not met. Who understands women better than women themselves? For example, going back to the topic of toilets – do not expect there to be a sanitary bin in a public toilet. If you need to dispose of used personal sanitary items you need to take a mini plastic bag and your own pads (no vending machines). This may sound like a small issue to some guys out there but it really shows a complete lack of thought and understanding of women and women’s needs. As a foreigner, when you’re faced with all the frustrating other “norms” and you’re missing simple basic sanitation facilities, it just gets too much!

Whilst there is plenty of room for women in the public sphere to shop and buy shoes, scarves, handbags etc. (no problem with that – I love shopping!), what about recognising their needs and giving them real outlets to have a voice? Even when buying underwear, you should also never expect to a female sales assistant. Lingerie is often sold amongst other generic items of clothing in clothing and accessory shops. I don’t know about you but I’d not want to buy intimate items from male sales personnel with no women around for sizing advice. Women need the care and assistance of other ladies when buying their undergarments. In short, women need to be more visible and taken into greater consideration.

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Don’t expect to find sanitary towel bins in the ladies’ toilets… (Photo: Wrote – CC)


Public and private spheres: Male attitudes dominate

On a more serious note, the above really points to a deeply ingrained patriarchy that goes beyond an inability to go out for a coffee or find a female shop assistant when you want one (they do exist though btw!). No, what it means is that women have to accept the social standards set by men – which are hypocritical and clearly point to a double standard in favour of men. For example, divorced women are “a thing”. The stigma is decreasing from what I’ve heard and whilst divorce should never be taken lightly, neither should a woman be defined/pointed out as “divorced” in a conversation… A woman is actually “left on the shelf” when she’s “past her younger years” but for men this is not a problem. When a slightly older lady does marry, she is seen as a very lucky exception!

Such sexist double standards also translate to the way in which men feel they have the right to regulate women’s clothing, as well as overall general behaviour. Extreme interpretations of Islam have led me to be told I should not even talk on a mini-bus. Yes, women should remain modest but they do not need to (and must not) be silenced. Women in earlier Islamic years were scholars, teachers and architects – and still are! The men often shout and bellow down the phone but a woman cannot sit and talk on a bus. It also makes me so sad and angry to have to say this but some women and girls are forced to cover their hair and bodies. This is totally un-Islamic but happens. Parents and spouses have been known to force their daughters/wives to wear a headscarf (khimar/hijab) and other longer outer garments (jilbab). This is an insult to God, our right to free will and the women who freely choose to cover themselves in both Muslim and non-Muslim countries, risking Islamophobic hate crime and discrimination in the workplace, street and even within their families. Yes, sadly it works both ways. Some girls in the Muslim community also face difficulty in wearing a scarf or face veil. Why can’t women just be left to make their own choices? What is in the heart is personal.

If we look at men’s behaviour though, there are clear double standards and hypocrisies. Smoking is haram (forbidden in Islam) but many many men smoke. I’m not here to judge though. My point is this: fathers, husbands and brothers would have a fit if their daughters, sisters and wives started smoking yet they carry on and puff away…

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The home: “a women’s place” (Photo: Groundhopping Murseburg – CC)


Social brainwashing: Male and female perpetrators

So, I’ve given you a few of my experiences and insights. When I’ve expressed some of my frustration and disbelief at these issues, my concerns have been acknowledged. Women themselves have agreed that this is down to culture, not religion. However, women – as well as men – also perpetuate these habits and enjoin in gossiping about women who “go against the grain” in perfectly moral, decent ways. The fact that some women acknowledge that restrictive norms are cultural (not Islamic) but also enjoin in or do not stand up to this this is what makes the reality of such misogyny really truly tragic. Many women have been brainwashed to follow these sexist norms which deem women and girls who are outside of the home more than deemed acceptable etc. as “behaving inappropriately” and the top end could seem them branded as “wh****”. By gossiping and backbiting away about the social activities of other women and girls, such females are “accepting” and keeping alive such outdated misogynistic values which can mean that any girl who does fight back or ignore these rules, risks her reputation and that of their family and ultimately her (and even her family’s) ability to marry and live a happy socially integrated life.

If you don’t believe in the poisonous power of social brainwashing in leading women to accept sexism and misogyny watch this video, showing one Algerian woman’s attitude to domestic violence. As you can see, women – as well as men – in believing in and accepting, rather than standing up and speaking out against these issues, are perpetuating sexist outdated and dangerous gender norms, stereotypes and even violence. From gossiping about women, to the very top end of the scale where some are even “happily accepting” domestic violence, it’s the same problem. On the one hand the report was made by an Algerian TV channel shows that awareness has been raised from the inside but if you watch the video, you’ll see that there is some severe social brainwashing and normalising of immoral sexist practices. Looking at the statistics in the video, domestic violence is a huge issue in itself, accepted by a large section of women.

These women are victims but will live on to victimise future generations of women and girls if things don’t change. Such men and women will be teaching their sons and daughters to carry and accept these practices. Misogyny in North Africa exists on micro and macro levels but remember this: no matter how small the incidents or examples are, do not underestimate the negative impact they can have on the lives of women and girls – it all comes from the same source…

Photo credits:

Babak Fakhamzadeh (feature image) (CC)

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