20 Shameful laws you’d never believe were real

Imagine living in a society where your basic freedoms are violated. Where you risk imprisonment for not following certain religious practices or from suffering devastating health complications? Well, it may seem unimaginable but this is the stark reality of human rights worldwide.

In fact, day in day our fundamental rights are being violated by governments worldwide. I’ve drawn up a list of 20 shocking legal scenarios in countries all across the world – across almost every continent – to show just how precious our human rights and why we must never give up the fight for freedom and justice worldwide. So with that, I present to you, in no particular order: 20 laws that you’d never believe were real – but very much are!

1. Being the “wrong kind of Muslim” can lead to the death penalty 

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In Pakistan, strict blasphemy laws include the death penalty for those found guilty

In Pakistan, Ahmadi Muslims are forbidden from calling themselves ‘Muslims’. If an Ahmadi Muslim gives the call to prayer (makes the azan), recites from the Holy Qur’an in public or greets people with the typical greeting: Assalam aleykum (‘Peace be upon you’) and is found guilty, then they not only face three years in prison but also the death penalty according to current blasphemy laws (although no such executions have yet taken place). Read one case here.

2. Having a miscarriage can lead to imprisonment

In El Salvador, if you suffer a miscarriage you could face 30 years in prison for “aggravated homicide”. Read about one ongoing case here of a young girl in El Salvador having suffered a still birth who has been accused of killing her child and is currently in prison.

3. Marrying the girl you rape means you can escape criminal charges 

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In 2012, 16-year-old Amina Filali (Morocco) committed suicide after being forced to marry her rapist. The law was later amended following protests and pressure from Amnesty International

Rather shamefully, in many countries across the globe, if you are found to have raped a girl/woman but marry her, you can legally avoid a criminal conviction. This is the sad reality in a variety of countries including Bahrain, IraqKuwaitLibya and Palestine. Thankfully, a host of other nations worldwide across the MENA region, Latin America and Europe – including Morocco, Egypt, Tunisia and Jordan – have  appealed / are soon to amend such laws with Bahrain next in the queue. See here and here for more information.

4. FGM is legal and carried out in hospitals

Despite attempts to ban FGM in Indonesia, the practice is still legal. According to UNICEF, a staggering 49% of girls in Indonesia aged 14 and under have been victim to FGM/C (2010 – 2015) which is in fact carried out in local hospitals. Read more here.

5. It is illegal to go to school in a headscarf 

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Public displays of “conspicuous religious symbols” mean that Muslim women/girls cannot wear a headscarf at school, whilst small crucifixes as pendants are allowed

In France, if you’re Muslim hijabi (you wear a headscarf) then you are unable to teach in State primary and secondary schools. Likewise, students cannot wear a headscarf to school. In 2004, a new law on “conspicuous religious symbols in schools” was introduced, meaning that Muslim women and girls were ever pushed to work/study in private Islamic schools or give up their right to wear their hijab. The law also applies for Jewish kippahs and Sikh turbans.

6. Your faith is officially banned 

Religious persecution is rife across the globe and China holds no exception. Having officially banned the practice of the Falun Gong, they’ve gone even further as to harvest their organs illegally. Read more here.

7. It’s legal to marry girls aged 14 years or under

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A 14-year-old girl in preparation for marriage (Indonesia) – Image credit: UN Photo/Armin Hari (CC BY NC-ND 2.0)

It’s estimated that 1 in 5 girls worldwide are married before their 18th birthday. In Bangladesh, Iran, Saudi Arabia and certain US States, children as young as 14 or less are also being drastically let down by the law. In Indonesia [pictured], the official legal minimum age for marriage is 16 for girls and 19 for boys, but exceptions can be made. Over in the USA, a series of legal “loopholes” mean children as young as five can technically be married to middle-aged men. In Iran, the standard legal age of marriage is a shocking 13 years old but girls as young as nine or 10 years old can be married by their fathers/grandfathers by getting permission from the courts.

8. You cannot go out in public as a female if you’re not covering your hair and body 

Imagine being forced to cover – not out of religious choice – but legal obligation? This is the reality in Saudi Arabia and Iran. In Saudi, women are legally obliged to wear an abaya (long gown) and headscarf, whilst women in Iran are also obliged to dress according to the requirements of hijab by wearing long, lose, opaque clothing covering the body and a headscarf covering their head and hair.

9. You can legally have sexual intercourse if you’re 14 years old in over 30% of European States

Did you know that across Europe, children – yes children – aged as young as 14 can legally have sex? This is quite simply unbelievable. Where is this you may ask? Well check out this long list: Albania, Andorra, Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Estonia, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Lichtenstein, Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Portugal, San Marino, Serbia and Vatican City. That’s a shocking 16 out of 52 States

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In just under a third of EU States, children aged 14 years old can “legally have sex”, meaning adults can escape prosecution for having sexual relations with young girls/boys

10. Husbands can forbid their wives from working 

In Cameroon and Guinea, if you don’t want your wife to work, then you have every legal right to forbid her from doing so. In Afghanistan and Yemen, a husband also has the legal right to stop/control how and when his wife can leave the house, therefore affecting her ability to work.

11. You cannot legally get divorced 

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As in the Catholic faith, the legal system in The Philippines means that a couple cannot get divorced – as is in the case in the Vatican City

The Philippines – and more obviously Vatican City – a married couple cannot seek a legal divorce. A couple can get their marriage annulled which requires a mental health assessment, court appearance and generally lengthy and expensive process. However, things might be set to change. Read more here and watch this space!

12. It’s legal to hit your wife 

Imagine if you were not only subject to domestic violence but had no legal right to seek justice? Well this is the reality in a host of countries including: Armenia, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Congo, Egypt, Haiti, Ivory Coast, Iran, Latvia, Lesotho, Niger, Nigeria and Yemen. Find out more here.

13. Telling people that gay people are normal is a criminal offence

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As astonishing as it sounds, the Russian federal law “for the Purpose of Protecting Children from Information Advocating for a Denial of Traditional Family Values” – known as the “Gay propaganda law” – makes it illegal to “promote non-heterosexual relationships” to minors. The law effectively stigmatises and entire community and promotes homophobia. Read more here and here.

14. Husbands face no legal charges for raping their wife

Despite the attitude of some people which denies marital rape as a “concept”, marital rape is in fact “permitted” legally in the following countries: Ghana, India, Indonesia, Jordan, Lesotho, Nigeria, Oman, Singapore, Sri Lanka, and Tanzania. In her study, Emily Shugerman found four of these countries also allow marital rape when the victim is still a child.

15. Women cannot legally enter football stadiums 

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Image credit: Chris Marchant (CC BY 2.0)

Iran comes up trumps again for another law aimed at women. Yes, if you’re a woman in Iran you cannot enter a football stadium – well not legally anyway. The reasoning behind this law? Absolutely no idea!

16. You can be executed for homosexual acts 

We all know that LGBT rights are sadly lacking in many countries but in 11 countries in particular, you can be executed for “committing homosexual acts”. Yep, in Afghanistan, Brunei, Iran, Iraq, Mauritania, northern Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, southern Somalia, Sudan and Yemen, you face the death penalty. Find out information here.

17. You can legally buy a gun but are deemed too young to buy alcohol 

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I find it very very odd indeed that in the USA, you can buy a gun (with some exceptions) aged 18 but you’re still deemed too young (and immature) to buy alcohol. Whatever your stance on gun ownership (I’m firmly against), I can’t see any sort of logic that says you’re only mature enough to buy alcohol aged 21 (a substance which can affect your own health and potentially other people through your behaviour) but you can own a highly dangerous violent weapon which can automatically kill others…?

18. Eating and drinking in public during Ramadan is illegal 

During the month of Ramadan, Muslims fast during daylight hours. This is of course – or should be – a spiritual choice for God and God alone. However, in many Muslim countries it’s actually illegal to eat and drink in public during daylight hours in Ramadan. This includes: Iran, Morocco, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the UAE. Now, I’m not advocating being disrespectful and wafting food right under people’s noses (a bit of sensitivity can go a long way) but for non-Muslims and non-practising Muslims alike (also those unable to fast!), this is a step too far.

19. You cannot join a worker’s trade union 

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Image credit: habeebee (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Trade unions are an important mechanism for workers, enabling them to come together for the protection of their working rights such as the right to appropriate, safe working conditions, equal adequate pay and the right to vacation and adequate rest and leisure. But if you’re in the UAE, trade unions are officially illegal. Full stop. Currently also illegal in Saudi Arabia, the government is now in the process of introducing the General Union of Saudi Workers.

20. You must earn £18,600 a year (plus £2,400 – £3,800 per child) for your spouse to be able to live with you in your country 

Picture this: you go abroad to study and you meet the love of your life. Or perhaps, you fall in love with a fellow student and decide you want to get married and stay in your country. What’s the problem? Well, hang on. If your partner is a non-EU citizen and you want them to live with you at home, unless they’re going to be your carer or they’re from a war zone, then you’re obliged to earn £18,600 a year to be able to sponsor them and apply for a spousal visa to live together in the UK. Add on top £3,800 for your first child and £2,400 for each other individual child. Where is this strange law? Well, it’s right here in the UK!

So there you have it folks – a small snapshot into just why we need human rights conventions, mechanisms, laws and courts!

Salam!

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Syrian medics on the frontline: an interview with the Medics Under Fire campaign

It’s been almost six years since the outbreak of civil war in Syria. Since March 2011, an estimated 11 million Syrian refugees have fled their homeland, whilst a staggering 6.6 million internally displaced Syrian citizens still lie within Syria’s borders, having also had to flee their homes due to the conflict. Within Syria itself, 13.5 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance.

The heartbreaking conflict shows no signs of ending any time soon. As President Assad and his Russian allies continue to bomb civilian homes, schools, and hospitals, there is sadly no peace for millions of men, women and children. Humanitarian aid workers and medical staff continue to risk their lives to tend to the sick with scarce resources. In light of this, I got in touch with the Syrian American Medical Society (SAMS) who run the Medics Under Fire campaign alongside the NGO The Syria Campaign to find out more about the situation on the ground in Syria right now. 

As a humanitarian organisation, the focus of SAMS’ work is: “to provide medical care and relief to any patient in need, regardless of religious or political affiliation”. According to SAMS, the major threat to their facilities comes from airstrikes from the Syrian government and its allies. 94.7% of medical workers who have died in Syria have been killed at the hands of the Syrian government. In exact figures that’s 750 medical workers since the beginning of the Syria conflict, with a total of  52 staff who have not been killed by Syrian/Russian government attacks. As SAMS notes, these figures only include documented numbers. They estimate that the real number is much higher.

In light of this and the immense difficulties that come with both living and working in Syria at present, I wanted to find out more about the realities and challenges doctors are currently facing in Syria. This is what SAMS had to say.

Thank you for taking the time to undertake this interview for Voice of Salam – your time is very much appreciated.

Although the conflict in Syria has been going on for five years now, there’s been a much greater focus in the media over the last few weeks – in particular on Aleppo. Could you give a breakdown on the current situation and state of emergency?

Eastern Aleppo City was evacuated in December 2016. Evacuees were taken to the Aleppo countryside, Idlib, and Turkey, for the most critical medical cases. Aleppo countryside has seen aerial bombardment in the past few weeks. However, the situation in other parts of Syria remains critical, including the recent developments in Wadi Barada, located north-west of Damascus. The area has seen intense shelling, and the Ain Al-Fijah spring has been cut off, which provided drinking water to many of Damascus’s neighbourhoods. The situation in Wadi Barada must be addressed. 

What are some of the human rights violations taking place in Syria both before and during the war and from which side? Who are the perpetrators and to what level?

Physicians for Human Rights has well documented the range of human rights violations taking place against healthcare in Syria since the start of the conflict in 2011. They have documented 400 attacks on healthcare facilities and the deaths of 768 medical professionals, the majority of which were perpetrated by the Syrian government and its allies.

In January 2017, SAMS published its report The Failure of UN Security Council Resolution 2286 in Preventing Attacks on Healthcare in Syria, documenting 2016 as the most dangerous year for healthcare in Syria.

The Medics under Fire campaign is run by yourselves – The Syrian American Medical Society – and The Syria Campaign. Could you tell readers a little more about your organisation, campaign and the work that you do?

When the conflict in Syria began in 2011, SAMS expanded its capacity significantly to meet the growing needs and challenges of the medical crisis. SAMS has since supported healthcare throughout Syria, sponsoring field hospitals and ambulances, training and paying the salaries of Syrian medical personnel who are risking their lives to save others, and sending lifesaving humanitarian aid and medical equipment to where it is needed most. SAMS also supports Syrian refugees in neighbouring countries with critical psychosocial support, medical and dental care, and art therapy programs.

The Medics Under Fire Campaign was created to highlight the horrific conditions that medical personnel in Syria have been forced to work under since 2011. Medical workers, hospitals, and ambulances have become acceptable targets in the conflict, completely undermining the Geneva Conventions and international human rights law. SAMS has lost too many medical staff and rebuilt too many destroyed hospitals as a result of the Syrian government’s campaign of targeting healthcare. 

What are some of the main issues and vulnerabilities that medical professionals in Syria are currently facing?

Healthcare has continuously been used as a tool of war in Syria, with the Syrian government indiscriminately targeting hospitals and medical facilities. The targeted strikes on medical facilities have left medical personnel without the adequate tools or resources to treat patients. Since the onset of the crisis, over 700 medical workers have been killed, and every doctor’s death or hospital’s destruction means that thousands of people will be deprived of life-saving medical care. The remaining doctors know that they will be targeted by airstrikes, but they risk their lives to continue to provide healthcare to patients in need. Because there are so few doctors inside Syria, many are forced to practice medicine beyond their expertise, and often without the resources they would typically have. Our medical personnel make do with what they have, but unfortunately because access is routinely blocked into non-government held areas, we cannot deliver the supplies that they require.

Could you tell us about some of the personal accounts you’ve come across?

SAMS highlights many personal accounts on the homepage of our website under ‘Stories from the Field.’ We also produced Syrian Medical Voices from the Ground: The Ordeal of Syria’s Healthcare Professionals

As a non-political organisation fighting to raise awareness of the human rights abuses taking place in Syria and aid medics working on the ground since the onset of conflict, what are the biggest challenges you’ve faced? Have the public been as receptive as you’d hoped?

We have had success in elevating voices of medical workers and attacks on healthcare. We were so amazed and moved by the tremendous support we received in December 2016 following the crisis in Aleppo. 27,000 people from 90 countries donated to our Aleppo Fund on Facebook, which raised over $1.5 million dollars. However, policy change has been limited and there has been very little change in the situation on the ground, despite global awareness and condemnation.

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For people out there who are currently disengaged or sceptical about the issues you work with, what would you say to them?

We would appeal to their humanity and ask them to see Syrians as men, women, and children like them. We understand that this crisis is now entering its sixth year, and there is a lot of compassion fatigue, but the world cannot turn a blind eye to the suffering that continues every single day. While politics have unfortunately played into the crisis, we must always remember the humanitarian side of the issue and the innocent lives that are at stake.

Where do you see your campaign going? What are your next steps and strategies?

SAMS recently released a report on the failure of the UNSC Resolution 2286, which condemned attacks on medical personnel. Until there is accountability for these war crimes, SAMS will continue to reinforce our hospitals for the safety of our doctors and patients, provide medical care for those in need, and advocate at the highest levels for their protection.

What do you envisage for the immediate future of Syria and the Syrian people?

We hope that the world continues to pay attention to the situation in Syria, not just Aleppo, and calls for protection of civilians. 

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How can we support the Syrian people, aid workers and medical professionals working in Syria?

SAMS is one of the most-trusted local Syrian NGOs working on the ground, both inside Syria and in refugee-host countries including Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey, and Greece. 

Choosing local Syrian organizations, like SAMS, to donate to or volunteer with is an effective way to reach Syrian men, women, and children and provide medical support to those in need.

Thank for your time and I’d like to wish your campaign all the greatest success in the coming future!

[…]

So spread the message and raise awareness! For further information please visit:

Acknowledgements:

I’d like to thank SAMS for their time and assistance in undertaking this interview and wish them all the success in the world with their crucial inspiring work.

Image credits:

Syrian American Medical Society (Medics Under Fire) (c)

Feature image: Johannes Zielcke (CC) – photo of Golan Heights hospital (Quneitra, Golan Heights, Syria)

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Ramadan Mubarak – How to support six humanitarian causes this month

Ramadan – the holy month of fasting for Muslims worldwide – is approaching. This is a month of religious devotion, charity and remembrance of those less fortunate than ourselves. Muslims abstain from eating and drinking (amongst other activities) during daylight hours in remembrance of the poor. For many of us, no matter hungry you feel, you know you will eat at sunset. Yet imagine not having anything to break your fast with. Imagine every day being a constant struggle. Many people – Muslim and non-Muslim – around the world are suffering due to poverty, natural disaster, war, persecution and much more.

In your very home town, there may be those who go to work hungry, having fed their children but gone hungry themselves as there’s not enough food to go around. You may switch on the TV and thousands of miles away you may see starving refugees fleeing war. People carry on suffering and aid donations are all the more essential, both locally and internationally.

Additionally, there are various Muslim (and non-Muslim) groups who continue to be persecuted, discriminated against and even killed. Whether victims of war, immense poverty or persecuted as religious, cultural and/or ethnic minorities, many face difficulty in finding safe shelter, practising their religion or simply surviving one day to the next.

So whilst Ramadan starts and we wish fellow Muslims “Ramadan Mubarak” (Happy Ramadan), let’s remember the following people and causes (in no particular order) and call one another to action.

1. The Syrian crisis

Muslims, Christians, Yazidis… millions of Syrians have and continue to suffer due to the Syrian crisis of civil war and religious extremism. Rape, torture, starvation, bombing…the suffering is ongoing. For the displaced Syrians still inside Syria, those living in controlled areas and the millions of Syrian refugees who have fled Syria, the situation in Syria is sad, complex and shows no signs of being resolved any time soon.

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Syrian refugee – Image credit: Bengin Ahmad (Flickr)

You can help by donating money and resources to provide aid both in Syrian and in refugee camps. You can also read more about Syria through my interview with Syrian-Palestinian asylum seeker Khaled – click here.

2. The conflict in Yemen

The Saudi bombings and the Sunni-Shia conflict in Yemen – already the poorest country in the Middle East – have led to more instability for this nation in which men, women and children are continuing to suffer. The war has been going on for over a year and so far more than 3000 civilians have been killed:

[…] the conflict in Yemen […] continues to take a terrible toll, with more than 3000 civilians killed, and 5700 wounded, since it began a year ago. If the violence and fragmentation continue, the people of Yemen face a very bleak future. The war has devastated an already weak infrastructure, with multiple attacks on hospitals and schools. It has opened vast opportunities for groups such as Al Qaeda and so-called ISIL to expand their grasp. Most tragically, the ongoing political unrest, violence and air strikes have created a massive humanitarian crisis. This could trigger refugee flows, further destabilising the region.

Statement by Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (10/03/2016)

The lack of public uproar against the Saudi led bombings is deafening and shocking. Innocent children are starving and the world remains shockingly quiet.

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Air strike in Sana’a (11/05/2015) – Image credit: Ibrahem Qasim (Flickr)

To get involved and help innocent Yemenis:

  • Sign the following petitions calling to end the violence: Oxfam, MoveOn
  • Donate: your help can provide essential aid for the Yemeni people

For more information on the war in Yemen, see:

3. The Palestinian crisis

Palestinians face immense economic and social discrimination, manifesting itself in great difficulties in attending school, frequent water and electricity shortages and high rates of unemployment.

You can support the Palestinians in many ways:

  • Donate: you can donate to provide essentials such as food and school supplies
  • Campaign: raise awareness of the issues
  • Petition: sign the following petition via Avaaz

4. The persecution of Rohingya Muslims

Whilst the media has gone rather quiet, the persecution of the Rohingya people – “the most persecuted refugees in the world” – is ongoing. A report by The Allard K. Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic (Yale Law School, October 2015) concluded that the persecution of Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar constitutes genocide:

The Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar’s Rakhine State have suffered serious and persistent human rights abuses. Myanmar authorities, security forces, police, and local Rakhine actors have engaged in widespread violence, acts of torture, arbitrary detention, rape, and other crimes causing serious physical and mental harm. The scale of these atrocities has increased precipitously since 2012. […] the majority of Myanmar’s Rohingya have been confined to villages in northern Rakhine State or internally displaced persons camps. […]conditions in both northern Rakhine State and the IDP camps are dire: Rohingya lack freedom of movement, access to food, clean drinking water, sanitation, medical care, work opportunities, and education. They live in conditions that appear to have been calculated to bring about their destruction. The acts committed against the Rohingya, individually and collectively, meet the criteria for finding acts enumerated in the Genocide Convention […]

Persecution of Rohinyga Muslims: Is Genocide Occuring in Myanmar’s Rakhine State? A Legal Analysis, p64

To help this persecuted minority, you can:

For more information, check out:

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Around 90,000 Rohingya’s live in cramped shelters in camps near Sittwe – the capital of Rakhine State – Image credit: European Commission DG ECHO (Flickr)

5. The oppression of Uyghur Muslims in China

China’s Muslim minority, the Uyghur community who live in the autonomous region of Xinjiang, have been facing increasing discrimination over the years. The Chinese State has banned face veils, forced certain shopkeepers to sell alcohol, introduced restrictions on beards and in the past banned fasting during the period of Ramadan. This year, the State has declared that there will be no restrictions regarding Ramadan – yet one can never tell given the secrecy and human rights abuses that go on in China.

How you can help:

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Men praying at Id Kah Mosque on Eid al Fitr – Image credit: Preston Rhea (Flickr)

6. The war in Ukraine

If you’d like to help towards the crisis in Ukraine you can:

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Image credit: Guido van Nispen (Flickr)

So there’s six causes that we are all aware of and of course there are many other worthy causes, many groups facing persecution and many more campaigns and petitions. This is simply a brief guide to current urgent and perhaps not so well publicised causes which we can all help towards.

So – brothers and sisters in Islam: Ramadan Mubarak!

And to all readers: check out the tips and get going!

Salam!

Image credit:

Feature image: Amila Tennakoon (Flickr)